Planning Pregnancy - Did you check Rhesus factor compatibility?

Log-in to Continue

Please input your mobile no.


Select Appropriate Country for OTP Verification.

Login

Lost Password

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link and will create a new password via email.

Loading..
Loading..

Ask Question Form.  × 

Describe your health issues in details mentioning the symptoms, family history, medications or any other diagnosis.





Male 
Female 


     

SUBMIT QUESTION

FastTrack Login/Register

30 sec and you are IN !! It takes only that much which a SMS takes in reaching you...

Planning Pregnancy – Your and your partner’s blood group compatible?

Planning Pregnancy – Your and your partner’s blood group compatible?

One of the first and most significant tests you should get done as soon as you learn about being pregnant is to examine your blood type and Rh factor. A different Rh factor may affect your baby’s health, so it’s important to get it checked in your early pregnancy itself.

Rhesus factor and Rh incompatibility

Everyone’s blood type is different. It is common knowledge that blood is classified into groups through ABO system in which a human blood is named as either A, B, AB or O, depending on the chemicals found in their red blood cells. But do you notice the plus and minus sign after these blood groups, say A+ve, A-ve? In simple words, this +ve & -ve signifies the Rhesus factor. Rh incompatibility is a difference in blood types between a mother and unborn baby such as mother is Rh-negative and baby is Rh-positive.

How does this happen?

This condition usually arises when mother and father have Rhesus incompatibility and the baby takes after father’s Rhesus factor.

Relevance of Rhesus factor and pregnancy

During pregnancy or delivery, when placenta separates from the wall of the uterus, a number of blood cells from the baby’s circulation can enter into the mother’s bloodstream. Normally this does not cause any problem but this is very significant for mother having Rh negative blood. If unborn has Rh positive blood inherited from father and if during pregnancy or delivery the mother and baby’s blood cells got mixed; the mother’s body will treat the baby’s blood cells as foreign substances and will generate Rh antibodies against them. Particularly during first pregnancy this doesn’t cause any problem as baby is born by the time enough antibodies are developed.

However, if you will have a second baby who is also Rh positive, then there is a possibility that Rh antibodies, left from the previous delivery, will move across the placenta and enter the unborn baby’s bloodstream. They will bind with the baby’s Rh positive red blood cells and will destroy them. As a result of this, the baby may be born dangerously ill and require an immediate blood transfusion or may die after birth or during delivery process.

Prevention

In such cases doctors administer a vaccination of Rh antibodies, in the form of ‘anti-D’ immunoglobulin, to the mother after delivery, to prevent her from producing antibodies that might harm future babies.

It is common practice for doctors to recommend Rh Factor test done on your first appointment to ensure necessary course of treatment is then followed.

Suggest this article to someone who has learnt about her pregnancy recently. It is common to skip this test in the excitement of the news, and might turn out to be troublesome for the mother & baby at later stages.

Comments ( 2 )

  1. User
    September 2, 2015 at 10:42 AM
    My blood group is B-ve and my partner's B+ve. What should we do?
    • September 3, 2015 at 10:20 AM
      Hello Dear,

      Thank you for writing to us at MediMetry.
      If this is your first pregnancy, then there is nothing to worry as of now. Rh incompatibility is a difference in blood types between a mother and unborn baby such as mother is Rh-negative and baby is Rh-positive.This condition usually arises when mother and father have Rhesus incompatibility and the baby takes after father’s Rhesus factor.
      Particularly during first pregnancy this doesn’t cause any problem as baby is born by the time enough antibodies are developed. However, it may be troublesome for the second pregnancy.
      If you are Rh negative and your husband positive, your ICT will be done in your first visit and repeated at 24 weeks and again if required. Accordingly immunization will be given around 28 weeks and post delivery in your first pregnancy to prevent antibody formation that usually affects next pregnancy. Avoid any kind of trauma and consult your doctor as soon as you are pregnant.

      Hope this answers your query. Feel free to write back to us with follow-up questions.
      Stay connected to MediMetry for regular tips on safe & healthy pregnancy!

Chat With Doctors Now

×